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Top 10 biggest pet peeves of cyclists and road users

16th August, 2021


Top 10 biggest pet peeves of cyclists and road users

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We all get annoyed from time to time, and it can be for any number of reasons whether it is people driving under the speed limit, or pedestrians walking three in a row and taking up the entire width of the path, but eventually, we move past it. However, there’s one rivalry that goes beyond this, and that’s the one between cyclists and road users.

It’s no secret that cyclists and road users aren’t best friends, and often find themselves disputing on who’s in the right. At Jorvik, we decided to find out what each party’s biggest pet peeves are in hopes to raise awareness and bring the dispute to an end once and for all.

 

Stats about cycling in the UK

Between 2018 to 2019, 3.4 million people in the UK cycled at least once a month, and 0.9 million people said they cycle at least 5 days a week, typically to and from work. In December 2020, the total number of full driving entitlement licenses in GB registered with the DVLA was 40,564,134.

Many of whom are likely to also be road users. So, we thought it would be interesting to see what the pet peeves are and whether we’re guilty of committing the very same bugbears we get annoyed at others for doing.

In no particular order, here are the top pet peeves of cyclists and road users.

 

Cyclist top 10 pet peeves about road users and pedestrians

  1. Mopeds using the cycling lane
  2. People not looking for cyclists as they walk out of their car
  3. Pedestrians walking in the cycling lanes
  4. Cars trying to ‘scare’ cyclists by following closely behind
  5. Verbal abuse shouted at them
  6. Cars speeding past to intimidate
  7. Dogs off their leashes
  8. Runners listening to music and can't hear us
  9. People temporarily parking in a cycling lane whilst they dash out
  10. People not looking for cyclists as they walk out of their car
  11. Buses. Just buses

 

Road user top 10 pet peeves about cyclists

  1. Cycling through red lights and stop signs like they don’t exist
  2. Not wearing visible clothing or having no bike light
  3. Leisurely cycling on a busy road
  4. Wearing earphones and not being able to hear when cars beep or pass
  5. They often ride two or three abreast, taking up vital road room, slowing down traffic
  6. Unaware of the special dangers of HGVs and larger vans
  7. Cyclists are dangerous and don’t take road safety seriously
  8. Roads were built for cars, lorries, and vans, not tiny bikes
  9. Not signaling when turning a corner
  10. Regardless of how experienced you are, cycling with only one hand on the handlebars is unnerving for everyone else

 

What’s being done to encourage cycling in the UK?

According to London Gov, the reasons people give for cycling less and less include the increased amount of traffic on the road, safety concerns, and the high rate of cyclist injuries from collisions with cars. The Mayor of London has ‘set a target of 1.5 million trips per day by 2026’.

 

Safety whilst cycling

Cycling on London’s main roads has almost tripled in the past decade and the number of cyclists fatally injured per journey cycled in the Capital has reduced by a third (33 percent) between the 2005-09 baseline and 2012. There were 489 cyclists KSIs (killed or seriously injured) on London's roads in 2013, representing 21 percent of all KSIs in London that year.

 

Whilst not all accidents can be avoided, there are ways to prevent them and protect yourself as best you can. It may seem obvious and easy to do, but it’s the one so many people don’t do – wear a helmet. A detailed review by Australian statisticians from the University of New South Wales, Jake Olivier and Prudence Creighton, found that “helmet use is associated with odds reductions of 51% for a head injury, 69% for a serious head injury, 33% for face injury, and 65% for a fatal head injury. Injuries to the neck were rare and not associated with helmet use”. Click here to find out more ways on how to be safe when cycling.

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